🌸 Mother’s Day Thoughts 🌸

As Mother’s Day approaches, I’ve been thinking a lot about the things that remind me of my own mother (the sun, sunflowers, the Yankees) and the ways in which she has shaped me – first as a woman, then as a mother. I look back in chagrin during my formative years, when I wanted to be anything and everything BUT my mother. I worry about those days to come with my own two daughters, when they’ll struggle to find their own identities. I wonder when that subtle shift occurred, from “you don’t understand me!” to “hey… maybe you know some things” to “you’re the first person I call when I need to get out of my own head.”

Becoming a mother is an ongoing learning experience filled with lessons big and small. One thing that I’ve learned to be true, is that relationships between mothers and daughters are beautifully, extraordinarily, inexplicably complicated. As daughters, how many times in your life have you said “I sound like my mother!” accompanied with an eye roll. Yet, how many times have you called your mother or reached out to her because you were on a ledge and she was the ONLY person who could help you get out of your own head? Yeah. It’s complicated.

The sun reminds me of my mother. I think it’s because if she’s in your corner, she cheers you on 100%. When my husband and I started dating, she learned that he’s a diehard Jets fan. And so, she too, started cheering for the Jets. She has an innate understanding of what’s important to the people she cares about; and so she celebrates it, big and small. Where the sun shines, love grows.

She sends me random texts, out of the blue, to tell me how she has noticed a positive change in me or something new that I’m trying. When I think no one else can see me, she notices these small things that mean so much.

My mother also suffers from chronic illness that has impacted her physically, mentally, and emotionally. When my babies were newborns and I was a sleep-deprived, everything-deprived zombie, I know I fell short in patience with her. Sometimes, I still do. But then I remember, she has genuine intentions of wanting to help me and my family. Like any mother, I can be particular about care for my girls or certain things in my home. She truly respects this, and works hard to maintain the order and routine I’ve established in our household. As a working mother who travels for her job, I appreciate this so much because of the peace of mind this effort provides when I’m away from home.

Recently, my cousin’s wife suffered the loss of her own mother. In the weeks before she passed, my cousin’s wife was at her side, taking care of her. She started a group text with me and my mom, communicating with us if she was having a difficult moment or not quite sure what to do. What I witnessed in this chain of texts was nothing short of an extraordinary act of human kindness and compassion. Most of the time, I found myself fumbling for words because all I could think of were the cliches found in greeting cards. But my mother responded with thoughts and paragraphs that simply amazed me. This is where my mom shines, in providing comfort and thoughtfulness when it’s needed the most. I was truly astounded by her ability to help my cousin’s wife through what is probably the most difficult time of her life. She just knew what to say, providing a light in the darkest moments of grief.

I am proud, and filled with gratitude, that this is my mother’s greatest gift. It’s not necessarily in the things she does, but in the way she makes people feel. I am fortunate to be her daughter, and to be a person she loves. Because where the sun shines, love grows.

By Courtney Spiak

 

Happy Mother’s Day to All!

CLICK HERE for a list of locations offering Mother’s Day Brunch (Phoenix, AZ area)

 

Thinking of a move?  Here’s a great new listing in a popular area of the East Valley (Phoenix AZ, area).  CLICK HERE for details.

Handling Tough Topics and the big Sleepover Question🌛

It seems like once your kiddo reaches a certain age, sleepover birthday parties and invites just start appearing in school folders.  This is a topic that is an absolute “no” for some families and a common event for others.  Navigating this can be really difficult – especially among close kid-or-mom-friends.

How do you tactfully handle tough topics with your kids’ friends or their parents?  There is no guarantee feelings won’t be hurt or offense won’t be taken but I am a big fan of honesty and having really clear expectations within your house before you communicate to others so everyone in the family is on the same page and knows expectations.  This avoids upset kids when the answer is no.

In our house we generally don’t do sleepovers and our kids know that and are ok with it.  They know why and they respect that decision.  There are a (very) few exceptions: cousins, grandparents, and friends whose families we are very familiar and have spent a lot of time with.  Statistics say that most kids that face abuse or unfathomable acts… they happen with people they know, so that is a really scary fact to overcome when considering how/when/if to allow your child to stay at another family’s house.

We have been in the situation where our kid was the only one not to participate in a sleepover.  Kiddo was ok with that because we had communicated it early on and long before the party that we just don’t do them with families we don’t know.  Our compromise was to let them stay for the movie and pick them up late, but we stuck with our rule.  There were absolutely no hurt feelings from our kiddo because the expectations were set before.  The child’s parent was a little upset that we were the only ones to not participate, but I was very upfront that it was our family rule and she respected that.  I didn’t try to make excuses for why she couldn’t stay so there wouldn’t be hurt feelings if she did do a sleepover with a cousin or something and it was discussed at school later.

There are lots of tough issues that families all handle differently – tech access, alcohol, curfews, guns in the home, supervision, where kids can go alone, etc.  The absolute only way to address any of these is to be upfront and get to know your kids’ friends’ parents.  It is worth making the effort and taking the time.  You don’t have to be best friends with them, but knowing them well enough to ask questions or share your concerns is important.  And in the reverse, do not be offended if someone asks you about these things in your home when their child comes over.  Every family is different, and asking “Are there guns in the home?” is not a statement but a completely reasonable and responsible question if you are going to be allowing your kid to go to a stranger’s house or someone else’s kid in your home.

I used to get so bent out of shape when parents brought up uncomfortable issues, but now that I have two kiddos, I truly appreciate when someone is brave enough to raise tough topics in an honest and respectful way.  Just like dealing with kids’ allergies – it would be irresponsible for the parent NOT to let you know or ask what you are having for dinner, and you wouldn’t be offended if they do.  We all need to extend grace, as we are all figuring this parenting thing out as we go and navigating some really tough issues in the process and a world that is more connected and immediate by the second.

Far more important than talking to friends’ parents… Katey McPherson in her talks always encourages parents to go with the rule of 5. Five years before your child is faced with a tough topic/issue (sex, drugs, guns, porn) you should be talking to them in an age appropriate way about your family’s values and empowering them with responses and ways to address if ever in an uncomfortable situation.  The absolute BEST protection against any bad influences or things happening to your child is their own self-confidence, their trust that you will NOT freak out if they ask for help in a tough situation, and that they are empowered to handle and stick up for themselves when they feel uncomfortable – and know how to seek help when they need it.

Many of our worst fears as parents are unfounded.  We spend weeks or years fretting over all the wrong things, while the opportunity to empower our kids with all the tools they need to extract themselves from the “worst” or make safe decisions, or get help in a crisis, is readily available EVERY day.  It is the BEST thing we can do.  We have the opportunity seeing things at school, on TV, in the news to raise tough topics and issues.  It is tough because the issues are serious, but it is necessary.  Don’t wait for someone else to teach your child about these things, do it long before they are ever faced with having to think, answer, respond about them.

And when faced with a tough issue you don’t know how to approach, ask for help.  I make a point to seek counsel from my spouse, closest girlfriends, and sometimes even other parents (who don’t know the family involved) when I am unsure of how to handle a tough situation.  Sometimes it’s good to get wise counsel before approaching another parent about an issue, because the emotions involved often cloud our better judgement, or we might be missing a perspective we haven’t thought about before.  I learn from my mom friends every day, and they are often the greatest source of counsel when dealing with a tough school or kid issue.  Lean on your village!

In summary – in approaching tough topics with your kids or other parents:

  1. Do it sooner rather than later.
  2. Be honest, don’t hide things or lie about the reasons – be up front with your kids and other mom friends when there is a concern or boundary you have.
  3. Respect mom friends who are brave enough to ask tough questions.
  4. Seek counsel from other moms or friends, while honoring relationships/privacy of those involved.
  5. Have clear expectations with your kids on tough topics: sit down and agree on these together, make sure they know your WHY. Do not spring a rule on your kids when they are invited to a party or have to respond publicly to something.
  6. Empower kids early and often with responses to tough questions, make sure they know they own their voice, their body, and the right to say no and exit ANY uncomfortable situation.
  7. Make sure your kid knows they can call you anytime for help or intervention. This doesn’t mean they need to have a phone but they do need to know how to call you and have a # memorized.
  8. If a parent is not respectful of your family’s boundaries/rules/wishes after you have been up front, or worse – singles out your kid because of it – it’s time to consider if that is a friend you want to nurture or you want your child to nurture. Often it is worth discussing and navigating even if awkward.
  9. Extend grace, every family is different and that is what makes friendships wonderful – we learn a lot from each other in the best relationships and in the different perspectives we bring to the table.

MOMnation is such an incredible resource on all these fronts, bringing a diverse group of women together to ask the tough questions, seek counsel, vent, navigate parenting, life, work, relationships alongside an incredible village!  Lean on your friends here, too!

BY: LIZ D, TEMPE MOM

 

CHECK OUT THIS EXQUISITE CRAFTSMAN BUNGALOW home for sale!

Right around the time when Arizona adopted our state flag and just before the spanish flu hit, this exquisite craftsman bungalow, The John and Eva Cummard House in Mesa, was built for the family that kept it in some fashion for the next 100 years.

 

 

 

 

Traveling with Kids: Part II – How to Pack & Arrive Sane

Vacations bring visions of beaches, breezes, reclining, and reading those books or magazines you just haven’t gotten to yet.  Vacations with kids are often not at all as the brochure advertised.   There is no brochure for a trip filled with barf, missing baggage, or panic over where the favorite toy has disappeared! But these are the realities sometimes traveling with kids.

We traveled on over 100 flights with our first kiddo – for work and for family trips – and many since adding to the family.  We recently took an overseas trip with 20 people, including 10 children – many were teens and two toddlers.  I have learned A LOT along the way and I’ve shared this with many friends traveling with their kiddos over the years.  Travel with kids seems overwhelming, but the ability to expose your children to new places, people, experiences, bond with each other, and make memories is absolutely worth it.  If you think back to your childhood, how many memories were made with parents and siblings or extended family road-tripping or somewhere away from home?  These are special times, and you can increase the enjoyment and decrease the stress with a few no-fail tips for every trip.

 

Here are easy action items and suggestions to arrive sane there and back for any trip:

Manage expectations. True in work, life, parenting, coaching – but no more true than on a sweaty tram home to the parking lot after a long day at Disneyland with two over-tired, screaming kiddos and a stranger’s armpit in your face.  Mickey was great but the ride home should have been one of Dante’s Circles. Start the trip with an honest admission that traveling with kids is hard work – away from routines, familiar places and things – naps may not happen on schedule or at all, people may puke, there may be delays.  Start knowing these things may happen and promising to your tribe you will roll through it, don’t hide the fact that traveling has hiccups from your kids. Prepare them for waits and that problems may arise and we all have to be on the same team to get to the fun parts.  It is worth it for lifelong memories, the bonding time, and for the adventure.  I promise you will remember the crazy and fun decades after you have forgotten what spilled apple juice smells on pants after a 5 hour flight.

Make a list. Sit down and talk about the trip, ask for 2 must-dos or three priorities of EACH member of the family. Let them share without comment from others until the list is made. This works for 2 person or 20 person trips.  Often some of the struggles on a trip can be totally avoided when we take time to figure out what matters most to those we are traveling with and plan around those priorities.  This often will reveal if there are unrealistic expectations and help you prioritize your schedule while traveling and make choices on the fly when plans change.  If you are traveling with a large group or small group, schedule it so that individuals or individual families have meals alone or everyone gets some down time EVERY DAY.  This will save your sanity.  And, take the list with you!

Simplify packing: Unless you are going to a third-world country, even overseas there are stores with diapers, wipes, mouthwash, etc. We all pack as if we were going to the deepest backwoods.  Unless you are…. My take after so many trips, and especially now with bag fees nearing what ticket prices used to be, is to pack only what you need for the trip there plus a day, in consumable supplies, and plan to stop at (with a family member or in your rental car) a Target or Walmart on your way to your first stop.  If you don’t plan to have transportation, it is hard to find a place that isn’t a block or a $3 Uber away from a Walgreens or grocery.  You will have to buy supplies to replace what you take from home anyway, instead of lugging it all around and paying to do so, get the bulk of what you need where you are going. Diapers, wipes, baby food, formula, even toiletries are all on sale and take coupons in nearly every city in the U.S.  Overseas it is harder, but I managed to find a pharmacy with the same over the counter meds we take at home, for less, and it only took 5 minutes out of my trek, instead of an hour to figure out what to pack and not.  Then, you can also buy that full size shampoo in the brand you’d rather use, or save more room for souveniers.  Pack your own medication, clothes, allergy-sensitive or special products, kids favorite toys (mine each get 2 small ones!), shoes, baby gear* (more on that below).  For clothes, consider doing laundry halfway through the trip (if more than 4-5 days).  Most hotels have laundry machines, some will do your laundry for a fee that is reasonable.  In a pinch, there is always the sink for underwear and small things like bathing suits that get worn over and over.  When we go see family, with their prior permission, we often borrow clothes so we don’t have to take much but shoes, underwear, and pjs.  Sounds crazy, but it has made it so much easier to travel and get through airports with much less stuff, and reduce wait times for baggage.

Carry On EVERYTHING: On all but maybe 10 of those flights… we carried on everything. I know you think I am nuts, but this decreases the time we are in the airport (germs, hassles, lines, stress) by at least two hours every trip, we don’t have to arrive as early and we can go straight to our car/transportation getting off the plane, usually skip baggage claim and bypass everyone waiting.  Even when the baby was little, even when I traveled alone, even when we went on long trips.  We roll our clothes, use space saving bags, and Dad gets the bags, I get the kids.  If I’m traveling alone, I usually identify someone in the security line that looks like a mom, dad, grandma or grandpa and ask for help with my bags getting on the belt or on the plane.  Usually I don’t need help if I have a roller bag and stroller and a backpack.  The stroller carries a LOT and you can bungee a carseat to a roller bag.  Older kids can also take a bag or two.  Our 3 year old did an entire trip recently with no stroller and dragging his own bag.  Mostly because he didn’t want his sister touching his bag, but, you know.  He did it.  I usually try to consolidate the kids into one suitcase for their clothes and the toy they sleep with, we share a suitcase, and then we and they each get a bag they promise to carry (backpack!) with their books/tablet/coloring stickers/snacks for the plane.

Essentials: Your kids are going to be bored once you reach 10,000 feet or 30 miles from home in a car. I promise.  If you are tech free family, all power to you.  Bring thin/light books, a coloring book they haven’t seen, crayons (plan to lose some on the floor at landing), snacks like granola bars, fruit leather/snacks, pouches if you are brave.  Window clings and those wixisticks are for whatever reason at least 15 minutes of fun.  Stickers/sticker books.  If you are a tech family, PRELOAD and don’t expect working wifi, most won’t stream video.  Make sure the tablet/phone has games and at least one movie that will work if there is no WIFI.  Plan to pay for wifi.  Southwest has a lot of free video content if you just connect to their WIFI.  And, plane trays and seat pockets are dirtier than most public restroom toilets.  I always – ALWAYS – wipe the entire tray, armrest, window down with a Wet One.  I don’t mind looking like the crazy mom if my kid avoids Influenza A the first two days into our Disney vacation.

Baby Gear: I may not offer a popular opinion here, but we found most of the baby gear (we tried A LOT and regret it) to be totally useless. Under 3 (probably 4) a stroller is essential.  Beware if you take your nice one…. When you gate check it, it will come off the plane with something bent or broken, possibly beyond repair.  Happened every flight.  We finally bought a $20 travel system on Craigslist, Evenflo, that lasted us through two years of travel.  It was a lightweight seat/car seat too, and worked great, had a big basket.  Graco’s wheels are too big for security belts at TSA… and will lead you to screenings you don’t want.  An umbrella stroller is better than no stroller, you can hang stuff on it.  Bring your booster seat (they can’t use these on the plane if no back).  And for a car seat between bucket and booster, we got a Cosco (not Costco) Scenera for $30 we use for any travel or we used to borrow one from a friend.  We now have an extra to loan to friends. TAKE YOUR CAR SEAT if you can.  Kids under 3 will often sleep if in a seat, and if not, they want to get down which is often not possible.  If kiddo is under two and you didn’t buy a seat and you are on any airline but especially Southwest, ask if it’s a full flight – really full – and bring it on anyway.  9/10 times we choose the last row, and no one wants to sit by two people and a baby.  If there was a seat, we got the open one and if not, they will gate check your seat (bring a bag even a garbage bag or sports bag to put it in).  Get tags for your bag and stroller BEFORE boarding is called.  Baby seats MUST go in a window seat. So consider that when booking, it is an FAA regulation for safety and non-negotiable.  Don’t pay for seats, they must seat a parent with a child and a baby in a window.  So unless you want to be sure you all sit in a row, you do not have to pay ahead for seat selection.  With the four of us we usually take two seat in two rows.  When you buckle a baby seat in make sure the buckle is facing away from the seat or into a space you can lift to release it.  We once had our seat stuck on a plane for a bit because we had buckled it facing the hard side of the seat and could not lift the tab to unbuckle it.  Ask for an extender if you need it.  And check to see where the buckle lies, in case kiddo is sitting on it.  Often there is nothing you can do but you can pad it with a diaper.  Take a bag that is a tote, zippered, on the top so you can reach into it easily while seated.  Or a backpack with easy front pockets.  I pre-filled bottles with toddler formula and breastmilk, so all I had to do was add water or open them.  TSA will likely screen breastmilk and bottles.  It’s annoying.  Be prepared to have to go to a different area with all your junk and have them swab them.  Buy water for bottles past security don’t take it through, even though it’s allowed, they are usually difficult about it.

Transportation: Car rentals are cheapest in the US usually weekend day to weekend day, weekdays are more. I like carrrentals.com the best. Go there, check the price, then check the cheapest company’s price on their website.  We have found more and more that Uber and Lyft are cheaper in most places (even Hawaii and overseas) than renting or even than some public transportation.  Obviously, be cautious and you must feel comfortable using these services.  We would send screenshots of the driver and car to whomever wasn’t riding with us for safety.  I even do this now in the US when I use it locally.  If you decide to venture into public transportation, ask for help from your hotel/someone that works at the train station, especially if you are in an unfamiliar place, before you set foot on the bus/train.  TRUST ME it will save you a lot of time and headache, and scary experiences.

Other People: Do not make gift bags for people flying on your plane with your baby. If you have to fly with a tuna sandwich your neighbor is eating, or their B.O…. you do not need to make apologies for procreating and traveling with your family.  There is a terrible truth in travel that upsets me every time I enter an airport.  Take a 30 something women, do her hair, put her in a suit and people will fall over themselves to help her on a plane or help her with bags. Take the same woman, put her in yoga pants, a shirt with spit up, baby on hip, and give her a stroller and people will literally part waters around her in an airport to avoid helping her.  My family has taken to seeking out moms traveling alone in airports just to offer a hand to get on the plane, or help with gate checking, ANYTHING, after so many terrible experiences seeing how parents are treated.  It is nearly the inverse for fathers traveling…. But that’s a whole other blogpost for another day. 😊 ASK FOR HELP IF YOU NEED IT.  From airport gate staff, or friendly-grandparent types.  Usually they are just thrilled to offer help carrying a bag or just helping get situated on a plane.  Obviously do not leave your kid or stuff with them, but they can be a hand to get through security or on the plane.  And OFFER THIS HELP even if it seems weird when you see a parent struggling traveling alone.  That one act of kindness can change an entire day/trip/memory.  Our youngest got seriously hurt when he tripped in the gate area on a trip last year, he cut his lip on the charging station on a seat, and was bleeding profusely, EMS were called and it scared him and us.  We were all shaken, including our older child.  A mother and her son ran to the nearest store, bought each kid a small toy and asked if they could give them to them.  (Don’t assume – ask…)  This distraction of them coming to ask and the toy calmed our son down enough to be examined.  He was fine, we were able to calm down, take a breath, and managed to make the flight.  The whole thing could have been much different and we may have been refused boarding, if he had not been able to stop hyperventilating-crying long enough to be looked at.  He was fine, we were fine, and those two happened to be sitting next to us on the flight.  Both kids – even the little one – made them thank you notes on take off.  Today, it is a sweet memory of the kindness of strangers instead of a traumatic memory.  Be that person.  We try to pay it forward every trip to other families with kiddos.

Drivealogue: If you haven’t seen these cards, they are conversation cards for families, for the car ride home from school, dinner table, etc. THESE ARE AWESOME FOR CAR TRIPS AND PLANE TRIPS and they make them in different age ranges.  Even great for couples!  I have a friend that sells them locally if you want some or you can buy them online.

YOUR TRIP: Finally, these are all musings from my experiences traveling as a mom and in business travel. I am an admitted over-organized, overthinking, germaphobe and plan ahead for even the relaxing trips.  Your style may be totally different (and, frankly, better)!  Set your expectations and then make sure what you do around housing, activities, packing, and schedules on your trip mirrors those must-dos and what you really want to get out of the trip.  There is no wrong way to travel with kids, just easier and harder ways.  Try to do it in the way that mirrors your family’s day-to-day needs and focus on the goal of time together and memories.

 

I wish you an amazing Spring Break whether you are staying home or traveling far, and pray that all your travels are safe and full of less stress and great memories!  If you have questions, feel free to email me or message me.

by: Liz D, Tempe Mom

 

CHECK OUT THIS BEAUTIFUL, BRICK AND HISTORIC HOME IN WOODLEA OF PHOENIX
This and more at EvoAZ.com

 

 

Traveling With Kids Part 1: Passports

 

Does the thought of traveling with kids give you hives or make you giddy with excitement… for me, it’s a little of both!

There have been many MOMnation posts asking questions about traveling with kids, so we hope to tackle a few of these common questions in the blog!  The first one is asked often: When Do You Need a Passport and Where?  And how do you get one?

Perhaps the best advice I’ve ever heard, from a fellow East Valley Mom, was to not call all trips vacations, even if it is “Spring Break” or “vacation time.” Some trips are just trips…. A lot of packing, travel, effort – worth it, but NOT relaxing.  Some trips are vacations and time to have fun, unwind, relax.  The MOST important thing to enjoy and survive a trip with kiddos is to manage your expectations of what the trip will be.  And…. Plan more vacations and fewer trips!

After over 100 flights with littles, hauling baby gear, breast pumps, strollers, so many security searches, and dealing with sea sickness and kiddo barf in a rental car (longest, smelliest 7 hour drive EVER… ironically – one of the most memorable)!  I can say emphatically, manage expectations and that will make your trip and your kids’ experiences much better.  And, I can’t say this enough, you never EVER have to make “I’m sorry for my toddler” bags for people around you on planes, unless the guy with the tuna sandwich or snapping gum plans to give you one too. Families have a right to travel and fly, and to do it without hassle from other travelers OR mom-guilt.

On to passports: Laws have changed over the years and the enforcement of passport rules can vary by area/checkpoint. But the State Department has clear rules (as do other countries) about what must be presented, and it seems enforcement has gotten more strict at the border since we were kids.  Even if you have heard, my friend said she didn’t have to show her license, even…. last time we went a few years ago, etc. It is always best to recheck both the State Department current guidelines and travel advisories before leaving the country.  It’s also important to note, this advice pertains to short trips, not long stays in countries that may require Visas and other documents.  You should always check the State Department for the specific requirements of the country you are traveling to.

Travel advisories are important as well.  They are advice.  In very few countries does the State Department actually prohibit travel, but you should know before you go.  If there are travel warnings, you must be aware and make a conscious choice to still take the trip.  We recently traveled overseas with a large group, including many kids, to a country that had an active advisory.  We went with a plan to be very observant, clear rules for adults and kids about safety, and stayed in tourist-friendly and “safe” areas.  We also signed up and registered our travel with the State Department so they could alert us in the event of any activity, and I’m glad we did.  The trip went well but I was glad we had the information before we left and to know we would be alerted in the event of a security concern.

Here are the details on land/air/sea travel and what you need for documents:

For Mexico:

If traveling by land you can use a passport card.  This is the size of a driver’s license, but NOT a driver’s license. Few places now accept only a driver’s license to reenter the U.S., and there are no guarantees that even if you did a year ago or years ago, you will be allowed back in the country.  If you plan to visit Mexico by land, get a passport card or passport.

The passport card allows for re-entry ONLY FROM LAND from Mexico, Canada, and sea port re-entry from the Caribbean or Bahamas.

If traveling by air even to Mexico or another country, you will MUST get a passport book.  These are more expensive but far more useful/used for more purposes, and also can be used for a variety of identity verifications in business and life.

Due to increased regulations, there is no guarantee that a driver’s license will allow re-entry into the country, or a birth certificate for a child.  I highly recommend not taking the risk.  Some will disagree with me, but after reading some of the stories from moms who have been stopped at the border, I highly recommend getting passports for ANY travel outside the country.  Due to the increase in child trafficking, border crossings are doing much more screening for this and it is important to be able to prove the relationship with your child (which is what a passport provides).

For air travel INSIDE the country, you do NOT need a passport, you need a state approved and AIR approved ID and I usually take my kids’ birth certificates or passports.  I have NEVER in 100+ flights been asked for this traveling domestically but I like to have it with me just in case.  Arizona licenses are only good through October 1, 2020 (next year!) for air travel.  Then you will need an air-approved ID or passport.  I recommend just getting a passport.

To obtain a passport card or passport, there are multiple requirements.  I recommend filling out the paperwork at home, getting the photos at CVS or Walgreens, and then presenting this packet at a local office (there are many in Phoenix Metro area).  This ensures that your documents are all in order and speeds up the process.  To obtain a passport or passport card for a child, both parents must be present or have a signed affidavit from the second parent – in order to avoid parents taking a child out of the country in a custody battle.  You need a birth certificate to prove citizenship and parent relationship, the other parent or a document giving consent, and passport-approved photos for the child.

If you need a passport quickly, there is a Tucson passport office that has fast-track appointments available and passports within two-weeks or even the same day in the event of a (provable) life-or-death emergency – i.e. a family member with a grave illness, etc.  Information below.

There are many passport expediting agencies that claim to get your passport faster.  I used one of these when I lived in D.C.  It did make the paperwork slightly less overwhelming but I found out I could have done the exact same thing for far less cost, and had it expedited as well, just applying myself.

Expedited service is usually within two weeks (barring a government shutdown), and regular service within four.  However, I requested expedited and received mine in just over a week.  You must send off original documents with the application, so be aware of that and watch for them to come back!  My best advice is plan travel as far as possible ahead and apply early for your passport!

Here is how to determine what passport/passport card you need:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/apply-renew-passport/card.html

Here is the information on the Tucson location (you do NOT need to go here to expedite service, only if you need the passport for an emergency or trip in less than 2 weeks): https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/requirements/where-to-apply/passport-agencies/western.html

Applying for a Passport for Children, rules vary for under 16 and 16/17 year olds:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/apply-renew-passport/under-16.html

Cost to obtain a passport card is $50-65, about half of the passport fee ($115-$145), rates vary based on renewals/new, adult/child.  Expediting fee is $60 per passport on top of the usual fees:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/requirements/fees.html

Where to Apply:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/requirements/where-to-apply.html

Check the State Department for safety advisories:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories.html

Travel advice, and registration for traveler advisories:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel.html

by: Liz D, Tempe Mom

 

Check out this awesome LIKE new home – 5 bedroom / 3 bath with pool in tempe! 
This and more at EvoAZ.com

 

 

 

#MOMlife is a Reality 👩‍👧‍👦

MOMnation is more than a village, more than a tribe, it’s a one stop shop for MOMs and it takes a lot of passion, talent and commitment to maintain.  In our new reality show, meet the MOMs that keep it all going and together while doing the same with their families, households and businesses.

Katie, Jessica, Jeni, Emilie and Nicole are founding members.  Catch a sneak peek into the inner operations of the group and the private lives of the MOMs that make it all work in season 1 of Inside MOMnation.

In episode 1, you’ll meet the 5 of us.  Catch an insiders view on our VERY popular signature event, Find your Soul MOM Speed Dating and an insiders view of a day in the life of Nicole as she works the family biz while killing in at #MOMlife…also, her very heartfelt share on her very first son, her rainbow baby.


In episode 2, you’ll get to know Jessica just a little bit better. Jess is the party planner, pro photographer extraordinaire and MOM of 4 that pulls off the most epic, fun parties and events like the Original Find your Soul MOM Speed Dating event and the annual Prom for MOMnation.

Stay tuned for episode 3…

Brought to you by Team EvoAZ at eXp Realty.  Filmed and edited by Brooke Johnson.

My Delicious but Low Sugar Holiday Treats for Kids!

Most Holidays bring with them a deluge of sugary treats. While most treats can be enjoyed in moderation it can be difficult to not over indulge. So I thought I would put together some Tips for having a delicious and fun Holiday without the high refined sugar overload.

Christmas Cookies!
Making cookies for the Holidays is a big tradition in many households. There are plenty of options that are refined white sugar free. Here are some delicious recipes that I found on Pinterest but there are countless others if you just do a quick search. Santa will thank you as he works late into the night!

Two Ingredient Cookies Plus Mix-ins

Sugarless Low Calorie Sugar Cookies

Cinnimon Maple Meringues

Coconut Almond Cookies

Vermont Maple No-Bake Cookies

 

Christmas Stockings!
Stockings can be a big refined white sugar source. If your child is already used to getting candy in their stocking and you don’t want to eliminate it cold turkey I recommend putting in one or two candy treats but then filling the rest with small toys and activities. The Dollar Tree is a great source of inexpensive kids items as well as stockings themselves, if you don’t already have one. They have puzzles, race cars, stickers, craft items, nail polish, you name it. Just try to avoid the candy isle…

Don’t forget the Pie!
My go to pie recipes are Apple and Blueberry. And both can be done without too much added sugar. I feel that fruit pies don’t need very much extra sugar as the cooked fruit already has a ton of delicious natural sweetness of its own. My favorite apple pie recipe is by Chef Chloe which you can find here. Her recipe does call for refined white sugar but you could easily reduce the amount or substitute it with Agave or any favorite sugar substitute. And as for the blueberry pie I found this recipe that I altered, instead of using ¾ cup of granulated sugar I use ¼ cup of agave syrup. Its delicious and goes great with vanilla ice cream and to keep the sugar down you could make “nice”cream using frozen bananas, vanilla, maple or agave syrup and almond milk blended until smooth.

Apple Pie tip: Make sure you peel all of your apples, it plays a big role in the final texture of the pie.

Blueberry Pie Tip: The above recipe calls for 5 cups of fresh blueberries setting aside 2 cups. 3 cups are cooked down and then at the end you add the final 2 cups of fresh blueberries which gives a nice burst of fresh flavor with each bite. Fresh blueberries can be a bit pricey so what I do is I buy a big bag of frozen blueberries and use 3 cups frozen for cooking and then just buy two cups of fresh blueberries to help reduce the cost.

Apple and Blueberry Pie Tip: You can make your own crust from scratch, buy store bought that is ready to go into your pie dish or if you don’t have a pie dish they also have crusts that are already in a disposable dish ready to bake.

I hope you like these tips and I hope they help you to get through the Holidays a little healthier but still keeping it delicious. For more refined white sugar free recipes head over to my Blog at PineappleAspirations.com.

by: Crystal Koel

SPend Christmas in an awesome new home like this 5 bedroom / 3 bath with pool in tempe! 
This and more at EvoAZ.com

Kid Friendly Holiday Craft by Banks Craft Co ☃️

Need a cute, kiddo friendly craft to keep your littles occupied and in the holiday spirit?  Here’s are a few awesome craft ideas brought to you by Banks Craft Co! 

Hand/footprint Wreath Supplies:

Square canvas
2 different green acrylic paint colors
Red acrylic paint
Letter stickers or marker to write on the canvas
Ribbon

STEPS:

Draw a circle with pencil. You can use a bowl of any kind to get that perfect circle.

Start handprints with one color green. Going around the circle but leaving enough room for the other color green (see image).

Next start the other color green. You can do all hands or all feet or a combo of both. Since we did 2 kids we did the younger ones feet & the older kid hands.

Add red paint circles for the “berries”. You can use a finger or pencil end.

Once dry you can add your stencil letters.

Using a hot glue gun, glue the ribbon to the canvas and enjoy!

“Let it snow” Snowman supplies:

Any size canvas
Any color finger paint
White, black and orange acrylic paint
Stencil letters

STEPS:
Let the kids finger paint the background!

Once dry apply white paint to the bottom of your kiddos foot and make footprints.

Add the snowman details with a small paint brush.

Add stencil letters.


Reindeer and/or Christmas Tree supplies:

Any size canvas depending on if you want to do both or just one design

Green, red, brown, yellow, black acrylic paint

Letter stickers

STEPS:
Using footprints arrange the desired design on the canvas.

Once dry add the details to the design you choose.

Apply stickers.

We hope you enjoy making these cute crafts with your little ones.  Keep an eye on our page, at Banks Craft Co, for more kid friendly and MOMs night out crafts!

 

LOVE AZ and want to start building your investment portfolio?  Good idea.  Call Katie with Team EvoAZ at 480-250-0023 as ask how YOU can get started.

MOMnationAZ ROCKS the World kickoff at the Tempe Festival of the Arts 🎨

MOMnationAZ participated in the super popular Tempe Festival of the Arts this past weekend and hundreds of kids flooded the booth to join in the two free art projects provided by awesome volunteers from our awesome local MOMs group

We met thousands of visitors over the weekend and enjoyed booth after booth of local art, live musicians, food trucks and, of course, the fun and interactive booths in the Kids Block.

MOMnationAZ offered free nature crafts and rock painting to kids of all ages along with a goodie bag chock full of freebies, trinkets and toys for the kiddos.

Rock paint artists were free to take their rock home to enjoy forever or were invited to join us at MOMnationAZ Rocks the World, a Facebook group following the travels of our painted rocks.

 

The instructions on the back of each rock read, “Post a pic on MOMnationAZ Rocks the World Facebook page and re-hide”.  If you see one of our rocks during your travels throughout the Valley, take a pic and post it to MOMnationAZ Rocks then re-hide.  Lets see how far these colorful rocks travel!

 

Join us at MOMnationAZ Rocks the World!  Just paint a rock, add the tag on the back, post a pic and hide it! 

Looking for a NEW, gated home in the heart of Gilbert?  This one is highly upgraded and ready for YOU!

Family Friendly Camping in Northern AZ

The idea of camping is vastly different to each of us.  If you have spent time camping as a child, it can have a Christmas/holiday type excitement.  Then, as you start to drift back down from reminiscing, logic and reality spark.  How many diapers do we need?  Did we pack toys?  When should we leave so that nap is not interrupted?  Do we have enough room?  Will we be warm or too cold?  The list goes on…

When camping with kids it’s always easier and more fun to go with other friends who have kids because it takes a village..lol  This will allow the kids to have a blast while entertaining each other, creating memories and exploring nature.  It will also give you the time needed to unplug from the trenches of parenthood and drink a beer with your fellow soldiers.

This was our first camping trip as a family and we decided to rent an RV.   We used RV rental outlet in Mesa AZ.  They were awesome and very easy to deal with.  Most of our friends have pop-up campers.  We realized, after renting an RV, that it’s nice to be able to disconnect from the pop-up and have a vehicle to go into town and or explore some trails.  We later purchased a pop-up because of this and a few other reasons.

Where to go?  Are you trying to escape the heat? It was helpful to check the weather in the area that you are thinking of visiting.

In AZ you usually want to be above 6,000 feet in elevation to get 70/80s when its 105+ in valley.  Most of lower lying areas like Payson and Prescott still hit 100s during the day in the summer.  This can make things the opposite of fun quickly.

We decided to go to a campground, Yavapi Campground to be exact, that requires reservations, has bathrooms, is closer in proximity to town and is 3 hours or less from Phoenix.  Keep in mind that cell service can be non-existent in some of these areas.  If you have a job that requires checking in, this could  make or break your true relaxation.  Research the options for connecting to ensure that you can connect when needed but still enjoy the feeling of being disconnected.   Verizon service was the strongest and existent in many areas while AT&T had no service anywhere at the campground.

When to go?  Make sure to check availability especially if traveling on a holiday.  Campsites fill up quickly and most are reserved for holidays 30+ days in advance.

The drive up to Yavapai was super simple from Phoenix.  Mostly I17.  Consider the traffic going north on Fridays and south on Sundays.  It’s best to hit the road before 3pm or after 6pm.

Yavapai Campground is 10 minutes from downtown Prescott, food & supplies.  It is less than 1.5 miles from Lynx Lake.  It’s within walking distance to the campground but beware, it’s downhill to the lake but uphill all the way back.  It might be best to take the car if you have little littles.

 

The next thing we did was make a “to do” list a few days in advance, listing all supplies from clothes (be sure to include warm clothes for nighttime) to household supplies like dish soap, paper towels and garbage bags.  We planned to make and eat most of our meals at the campground so the list continued with cooking supplies, food, snacks, cookware and storage supplies.  Of course, we could not forget the most important part, S’mores supplies!!  We did work out a “meal share” plan with our friends which basically means each family is in charge of one meal feeding the entire clan.  We each took our turn and it worked out great!

We had a great time and would fully recommend this campground to anyone looking for family friendly Prescott camping areas.

 

 

Matt Lambert is a local Realtor, super Dad and lover of the great outdoors. Find out more about Matt at EvoAZ.com.

 

Want to live close to the great outdoors but still be close to the freeway system and work?  Located at Val Vista and McKellips, this 4 bedroom home is not only affordable but in a great location, just a quick drive to the lake or mountains!  Details here or call 480-250-0023.

 

 

Lou Learns to Adult: Communication Basics!

Why does Lou need to “learn to adult”?  This sounds like a silly question, and it probably is, but by answering it you’ll get to know more about me, where I’m coming from and why I need to learn how to adult at this age.

I was born a very long time ago in a small town in Ontario, Canada.  My cousin, JP, was my best friend. We were born 40 days apart. He’s older.  We even went to kindergarten together. And then we left that town and my best friend behind because my birth father, or “sperm donor” as I call him, was not a very good person.  My Mom, older sister, younger brother and I moved a province over to a slightly bigger, small town in Manitoba, Canada.

 

I went to a Catholic elementary school for grades 1-6.  I made many good friends and was quite happy. Then my Mom met my Dad (Step Dad technically, but he adopted us and raised us, so he’s my real Dad).  Again, we packed up everything we knew and moved to a city a couple hours away. Keep in mind, computers hadn’t really been invented yet, so I didn’t get to keep in touch with all my friends on social media.  

I had a sister join the family when I was 14 years old.  She will never live down the fact that every time I babysat her, and told her to do something she would utter, “You’re not the boss of me”.  Surprisingly, I still like her.

I struggled starting Middle School in a new city and a new school that happened to be several times bigger than I was used to, and I not so gradually took a wrong turn.  It just got worse in High School. I made bad decisions and ended up dropping out of High School in my last year.

 

 

 

Luckily, a few years later, my Aunt went back to get her GED and I decided to join her.  It turns out that I graduated from the same High School as The Man, in the same year. We just didn’t know each other yet.  My GED classes were at night. And I was “significantly” older.

I got the odd job, mostly retail, and I actually enjoyed working with people.  Even though a healthy portion of them did not play well with others. I had no desire to continue my education formally.  At that moment. I lived with my then boyfriend and our cats. After my seven and a half year relationship ended when I was 25, I kinda crashed for a bit.  But then I started to learn how to be alone, how to do things for myself.

Early the following year, I met my knight in shining armor, The Man, and he wanted to take care of me from our very first date.  I had no problem letting him. It was hard to be an adult and I felt that six months of it was enough for me. We got married a year and a half after meeting (on a date that I had picked out three months after meeting).  I went to college for “Studies in Special Needs Child Care” because I was passionate about those sweet souls. A few months later, The Man got a job offer in Oregon. We had to take the chance for an adventure.

An adventure it was….

I was a “Stay at Home Wife” for the first three years of living in Oregon.  I didn’t have permission from the Government to work. Since it was the Government telling me that, I didn’t want to risk it, so I didn’t really do much work around the house either.  And then I became a “Stay at Home Mom” and had a different excuse to not do much around the house.

Fast forward to twenty-two years later, and I’m wondering why I can’t do much for myself.  This is not to blame The Man at all. He took care of me out of love and I let him out of laziness.    

Maybe there’s something about seeing the big 5-0 looming in the not-so-distant future that makes one think, “What am I doing with my life?”  It could be the fact that the kids are getting older and I want them to do more around the house. Or maybe it’s the constant arguing about someone not being able to rely on the other someone with important matters.  Maybe. We may never know.

Either way, it’s time that I learn how to “adult”.

Let’s start with a topic that is very personal to me.  Talking on the phone. I absolutely hate talking on the phone.  Hate! At one point, the voicemail on my cell phone said, “Hi, it’s Lou.  Are you sure you can’t just text me?” I hate calling my family just as much as I hate calling the IRS.  No offense to them, but my family is crazy.

I think part of the reason is that I have a bad memory, so any time I talk on the phone, there is no record of it that I can refer back to.  Another reason, and one that explains why I like to write instead of talk, is that I can’t think quickly on my feet. I need time to digest what was said to me and how I want to respond.  I need to be able to edit my thoughts, and doing that while on the phone just leaves awkward silences. But, in order to be a grown-up I need to do this, so I will practice. Before I make a call, I’m going to practice what I want to say.  I may even make notes.  

Once you get up the courage to make a call, what are some ways to do it properly?  

For example, if you are calling a business about a job that you just applied for, try this; “Hello, my name is Adam Adult.  I’m calling to speak to the manager about an application I submitted” Sounds way better than, “Ummm, can I, like, talk to the manager”.

Another pointer, that I have to mention to my kids constantly, is how to answer a phone.  Say, “Hello”. Could it get any easier? Even a quick, “Hi” would suffice. Stop picking up the phone (and for those in this century, pressing the button to answer the phone) without saying something!

Next up we should discuss communicating with people face to face.  That tends to happen in real life, too. You need to make a good first impression when meeting someone new.  When speaking with someone in person, do your best to look them in the eye. I know for some people it’s hard to do, but it’ll get easier the more you do it.  Use a firm grip when you’re shaking someone’s hand. There’s nothing worse than limp hand. So gross. And stand up, for Pete’s sake. When they are speaking, listen.  Don’t listen to interrupt and respond. Listen to hear what they’re saying. This actually goes for every time a person is speaking to you. When you’re with someone, a nice thing to do is to ask them questions about themselves.  It’s not all about you. No one wants to sit there and listen to you talking non-stop. Trust me.

Now that you’ve practiced speaking to a real human in real life, the obvious next step is to speak in public.  Yes, in front of a group of real humans.  This is going to take a lot of practice for some people. Some people just have a natural ability to speak in public.  Those people must be wizards. It’s just not normal. But we’re learning.

Step one, and I think the most important, for speaking in public would have to be knowing something.  Please educate yourself on the subject. And then maybe learn a bit more, just to be safe. Practice what you know until you’re confident on the subject matter and what you want to say.

Hooray!  You’ve survived your speech, now what?  I’m sure you’ll be surrounded by many adoring fans.  If you don’t know them, you can introduce yourself. It’s true.  Look ‘em in the eye and say, “Hi, I’m Gloria Grown-up, it’s nice to meet you”.

 

 

 

What happens if you have two people that you know, but they don’t know each other?  Don’t panic! Introduce them. There’s no stopping you now. They say that you’re supposed to speak to the “more important” person first.  So, you’d have to say, “More Important Person, I’d like you to meet Other Person. Other Person, this is More Important Person”. But, that sounds so archaic.  Maybe just pick the person you know the best or have known the longest and do it that way.

Now get out there and be a good grown-up!!  

Learn more about Lou from her blog at LouLearnsToAdult.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moving?  Visit EvoAZ.com for current and upcoming homes for sale, perks for sellers, local info and more.

This perfect little mid century modern, 1950’s home located in West 2nd Historic District in Mesa is cuter than cute and in a killer location.